The Single Parent Generation Statistics

 


Some very concerning fact that we must change as soon as possible to save this country. The Single Parent Generation Statistics:

-63% of youth suicides are from single parent homes (US Dept. Of Health/Census) – 5 times the average.

-90% of all homeless and runaway children are from single parent homes – 32 times the average.

-85% of all children who show behavior disorders come from single parent homes – 20 times the average. (Center for Disease Control)

-80% of rapists with anger problems come from single parent homes –14 times the average. (Justice & Behavior, Vol 14, p. 403-26)

-71% of all high school dropouts come from single parent homes – 9 times the average. (National Principals Association Report)

Single Parent Factor in Education –
Single parent children are twice as likely to drop out of school.

-Children with Parents who are involved are 40% less likely to repeat a grade in school.

-Children with parents who are involved are 70% less likely to drop out of school.

-Children with Parents who are involved are more likely to get A’s in school.

-Children with Parents who are involved are more likely to enjoy school and engage in extracurricular activities.

-75% of all adolescent patients in chemical abuse centers come from single parent homes – 10 times the average.

Single Parent Factor in Drug and Alcohol Abuse – Researchers at Columbia University found that children living in two-parent household with a poor relationship with one parent are 68% more likely to smoke, drink, or use drugs compared to all teens in two-parent households. Teens in single parent households are at a 30% higher risk than those in two-parent households.

-70% of youths in state-operated institutions come from single parent homes – 9 times the average. (U.S. Dept. of Justice, Sept. 1988)

-85% of all youths in prison come from single parent homes – 20 times the average. (Fulton Co. Georgia, Texas Dept. of Correction)

Single Parent Factor in Incarceration – Even after controlling for income, youths in single parent households still had significantly higher odds of incarceration than those in mother-father families. Youths who never had a father in the household experienced the highest odds. A 2002 Department of Justice survey of 7,000 inmates revealed that 39% of jail inmates lived in mother-only households. Approximately forty-six percent of jail inmates in 2002 had a previously incarcerated family member. One-fifth experienced a father in prison or jail.

Single Parent Factor in Crime – A study of 109 juvenile offenders indicated that family structure significantly predicts delinquency. Adolescents, particularly boys, in single-parent families were at higher risk of status, property and person delinquencies. Moreover, students attending schools with a high proportion of children of single parents are also at risk. A study of 13,986 women in prison showed that more than half grew up without their father. Forty-two percent grew up in a single-mother household and sixteen percent lived with neither parent

Single Parent Factor in Child Abuse – Compared to living with both parents, living in a single-parent home doubles the risk that a child will suffer physical, emotional, or educational neglect. The overall rate of child abuse and neglect in single-parent households is 27.3 children per 1,000, whereas the rate of overall maltreatment in two-parent households is 15.5 per 1,000.